13 Tips To Create Remarkable Content

Everywhere I read, I see this word, “remarkable.” I believe it’s launch into stardom began with Seth Godin; I’m giving him that credit anyway. In a book I’m reading on Inbound Marketing by Hub Spot, the authors substitute “remarkable” for “unique.”

Be remarkable = be unique.

We’ve all spoken about the echo chamber. Today, I read four iterations on the same topic in re Instagram and Facebook. Each was different, but were they remarkable? I think remarkable is in the view of the reader; I’ve not seen a checklist for remarkable writing, have you?

All Bloggers Are Unique

Over at Erica Allison’s house I wrote a guest post about my learnings from a post I wrote on pink slime. It wasn’t received as expected, so I learned and wrote about it. In comments on that post, Michelle Quillin of New England Multimedia and Erica each suggested there’s a graciousness that comes when I stick my neck out with opinion while watching the sparks fly. Somehow, I re-position and opine again, but I have this eagerness to be current and on top of issues that are unfolding in real time.

Erica said she perhaps misses the boat on hot-button issues because she fact finds and analyzes and ensures she has an opinion based on proof points. Then she sits to write her post that takes a deep dive into the vortex.

Who’s remarkable? Neither. I’m a risk taker and she’s not; I share opinion based on wide review of readings and not supported by finite fact. I source a national story and go from there. Erica finds all the information until she can substantiate her content and button it all up.

So, is it possible to develop remarkable content? Unique material that no one else is writing about? Nope, I don’t think so, but we can at least strive to take a remarkable approach — a new and singular angle, be the first out of the gate with thoughts, be strong and confident in statements sprinkled with proof points and facts cited by reputable sources.

Is this remarkable? Nope, it’s smart.

If someone has told you bloggers have to create remarkable content to stay published or go national or get ranked on a list, that’s bogus. On the flip side, if someone, named Jayme Soulati, shared this list of smart tips for bloggers who strive to be remarkable, I’d say that’s #RockHot:

13 Tips to Create Remarkable Content

1.Read, read, read all the national publications you can get your hands on for current events, stories on an industry, material that interests you.

2. When a story appeals to you as blog fodder, tear it out! Jot a note in the margin with the story idea so you don’t lose it. (I wrote five pitches to a client for blog posts; when I opened up Smart Money, two of the  topics were featured stories in the magazine! So, trust your instinct about topic development.

3. Do not read your favorite bloggers every week and expect they will deliver current news. You need to get your news from journalistic sources along with your favorite bloggers.

4. Once you’ve learned the style and voice of your favorite blogger, you might be able to glean a bunch of current news from their writings. Is it credible, cited, sourced, trustworthy? Some bloggers will dive into an issue (I’ve seen Shonali Burke do this stunningly well), and you can trust it’s the real McCoy. Gini Dietrich always provides current news with a twist; you can find her over at Spin Sucks.

5.  Take a story that interests you — perhaps it’s the Zimmerman case unfolding as we speak or the new trial of John Edwards set to begin shortly, or the issue of transgenders being permitted to compete in the Miss Universe pageant, or women still barred from the Masters — and follow this issue with all the nuggets of information.

6. Form an opinion about a current event that is based on proof points, supporting evidence, documentation, citations, and, most importantly, your impression.

7. Write about it. Tell your community you’re going to follow this issue as it unfolds and ask them to follow with you. Get thoughts that percolate in the community; ask for opinions and honor them.

8. Honor your community’s emotions and take their pulse. Ponder all types of commentary. If you’re fortunate to have a community like the one here, the comments are not banter; they are thought-provoking and stimulating.  Not sure how I, queen of banter, have been able to develop such an intelligent community, but I’m grateful!

9. Craft and mold these insights into deeper, more remarkable content that has been “community-sourced.” I learn so much more in comments than I do just writing unilaterally. If you haven’t cultivated a community, let me know, and we’ll see about making that happen for you…not sure how I do it, it just happens.

10. Ensure your content is sprinkled with links to  your favorite bloggers or others with content you need to support you. Cite other sources that are reputable and provide background information as proof points for your opinions.

11. Publish regularly and before  you do, DO NOT read your favorite blogger and then go write your story! Write your story first and then go read the A-lister and see if you can include a link in your post.

12. So much of blogging is about trying to be original, authentic AND remarkable in an echo chamber amongst millions of bloggers striving for the same. When you hit your stride and find your voice, then you will surely begin to feel remarkable.

13. Embrace the ebb and flow of life and know that life happens. Blogging is a journey, and it perfects with time and practice. If the need arises, go dormant awhile and reawaken  your mojo. I promise, it will come back.

So, how do you create remarkable content? Simple; by creating a remarkable you.

 

32 comments
EricaAllison
EricaAllison

Jeez, I sound like a coal powered train compared to you, the bullet shooting out of the gate from town to town. :) I think we both take risks, actually, just in different ways. Risk can be measured by WHAT is said, just as much as WHEN it's said, don't you think?  You always make me think, Jayme and I do appreciate the shout out from your house - sorry I was traveling when you hit publish!

 

Like Gini, I love #11 as well - so true. You'll always think you're echoing the echo chamber if you read those A-listers first. I do a cursory review of what's been written from a variety of sources, but rarely check in with the A-list. I'm not even sure I know who they are anymore. :) 

jonbuscall
jonbuscall

Good stuff Jayme! I think what I do sometimes is rework older pieces in a different format, whether it's text, video or audio. I find that just shifting format gives me a different take, a new perspective. 

 

Being 100% original all the time is impossible. Sometimes you need to step back and rework, rethink. 

TheJackB
TheJackB

I am about to write a post called "Don't Reinvent the Wheel" that touches upon some of this. Yes, I engaged in social douchebaggery by promoting myself a little bit here. But to rectify that I hope to link to this post and send Madam Soulati two of my 17 readers.

 

People over think this writing stuff.  I am an advocate of not trying to be remarkable because it leads to lackluster and boring results. That is not sarcasm either, that is my belief.

Latest blog post: Pools of Blood

3HatsComm
3HatsComm

Good tips, all. Recognizing that this is a journey - one without a 'final' destination - is a big point. There will be ebbs, flows, bumps, leaps, gold stars and dark days; have to keep at it, time and practice, always.

 

About the links to and from the 'A list' or 'favorite' bloggers: my mileage varies. Sometimes I read a post, think it's dead wrong and deem to write it; but usually I leave a lengthy comment in objection, then link back to the post as I did with Jay Baer's post on Facebook's 'betrayal' of small business. Other times I write what I feel like writing, and what I've read along the way creeps into the process. Sometimes I know straight up some links to include, others it's 'all me' and I search for quality posts that reinforce, expand my thoughts - supporting evidence as you say. Different strokes, n'est pas?

 

"I learn so much more in comments than I do just writing unilaterally." This! 110%. This is what I was trying to explain to @NealSchaffer when he blogged about not being as interested in comments as social sharing, currency. Again with different strokes, different objectives for blogging. I get so much from the discussion; yes I'd love 100s of tweets and plusses, but 10 quality, thought-advancing comments are gold - to me and hopefully, other readers.

 

I think @Faryna is right - Remarkable, Uniqueness like anything else is in the eye of the beholder. If you've never seen it before, you might find something unique; odds are it's not, it's just remarkable to you. I like to think I have my own style. I do write to cover these 'echo chamber' topics in ways I think others don't, ways I think the audience will think, 'oh now I get it!' Doesn't matter if I'm special - matters if others think so, hire me to do so for them. FWIW.

Faryna
Faryna

What is remarkable?

 

When I was 18, i read this crazy book, Meetings with Remarkable Men by G.I. Gurdjieff. Gurdjieff was a crazy Georgian and 20th century cult leader. Remarkable, for Gurdjieff, was the unstoppable passion and fearless determination of those who seek truth about who they are, why they are here, and how to forcefully live the wisdom which they acquire.

 

Remarkable, I am not. Almost. But no, not remarkable. And if I am not remarkable, I cannot write remarkable things. But I will try. [smile]

 

What is unique?

 

Unique, I feel, has been much abused and misused. Original too. And I know all about trying to be original. I also sorted out that non-sense at 18. At some point in my senior year of high school, I had an epiphany that just because I felt myself to be a misfit, a freak, and a creep - that didn't make me, meaningfully, original and unique. More importantly, it didn't make me or my ideas more compelling. Or more true.

 

What is worthy of love?

 

It would take me 20+ years to receive a more useful insight. The only things worth doing are the things worthy of Love. And, honestly, I have never been more challenged to live truthfully than now. For love, it demands greatness. Every day. And greatness serves what is beautiful, true, and good - not necessarily what we imagine, desire, and envy.

 

Big hug to you, Jayme.

 

Recently on my blog: @tweeting_lies writes about how he feels Out of Step http://wp.me/pbg0R-J8 

 

 

New England Multimedia
New England Multimedia

Jayme, it takes courage to stick your neck out there, and that's what you have. Either that, or you're impulsive and have learned how to handle criticism graciously! But it's the way you treat dissenters that makes you different. Over and over again, I see you treat dissenters with gratitude (root word: grace!) for their insights and opinions. I remember the "glass shards" post you wrote and deleted back when I first met you online. I'd love to see you write about that post for us, and how you might handle it today! 

ginidietrich
ginidietrich

I agree with #11! Well, I agree with all of them, but #11 is one that needs to be called out. We have to find our own voices (didn't you write about that for Spin Sucks??) and do it in a way that's remarkable and, well, us.

Howie Goldfarb
Howie Goldfarb

Reminds me of that little rascals episode where thlhe kid knows only one word. Remarkable. Great post Jayme i am often like you i shoot first and dont always craft remarkably enough. Great tips!

Soulati | Hybrid PR
Soulati | Hybrid PR moderator

 @jonbuscall Thanks, Jon! Appreciate the tweet, too. You know what? I have never repurposed old content; in fact, I rarely read old content. It's there in the archives and I go hunting for a link every now and again, but to give it a new format...hmm. Maybe that's how a podcast series could be born! I have too many ideas; it makes me crazy.

Soulati | Hybrid PR
Soulati | Hybrid PR moderator

 @TheJackB I appreciate link love and I admit, as my friend Stan below, I didn't comment on Pools of Blood. Don't go changin', The Jack.

Soulati | Hybrid PR
Soulati | Hybrid PR moderator

 @3HatsComm  @NealSchaffer  @Faryna GREAT seeing you today, Lady! Excellent thoughts on all this; we better get that Neal Schaffer over here for a few lessons from us, eh?

 

I am amazed and thankful when people say, 'wow, Jayme, I didn't know that." That means I'm adding value and not just tooting my horn with my own self-aggrandizing opinions. I never want to to do that.

Soulati | Hybrid PR
Soulati | Hybrid PR moderator

 @Faryna  @tweeting_lies Haha, Stan, my dear. I was over at that blog of yours today and decided not to say a word. Sometimes you are so amazingly off the wall and then you came back to Earth a moment to drop prose as that above and cause me great thinking in my unremarkable head. Stop worrying about 20 years ago and get to lovin...you're obviously made for just that!

Soulati | Hybrid PR
Soulati | Hybrid PR moderator

 @ginidietrich Thanks, Gini! I have this gift for creativity and somehow when I'm writing for others, and especially you, I step it up a notch and perhaps think longer, harder to add something unique/remarkable? to the post. That voice post was so fun although I had to edit 400 words out of it! And, it was well received, too.

 

Too bad I've soured on remarkable as a word; a bit overdone. Thanks for popping over, you busy bee.

Soulati | Hybrid PR
Soulati | Hybrid PR moderator

 @HowieSPM I don't think there's anything wrong with shooting from the hip, do you? It's just that we might get more hand slaps than others because we didn't deep dive into the issue like others might. But, that's me; that's you -- it's what makes us we.

 

Now, how's the self hosting coming? I can't for the life of me ever find your blog to come comment at your house. Thanks to @shonali for helping me out ONE day. Appreciate you stopping in to score first!

Faryna
Faryna

I think a podcast series is a great idea, Jayme.

jonbuscall
jonbuscall

@Faryna @soulati great idea! Look back at your data and see how many great posts just don't get the traffic they should, then rework for audio or video.

New England Multimedia
New England Multimedia

 @TheJackB  It made me think of my Dad, a well-decorated retired military officer (now a successful businessman) who flew 'copters in Vietnam. Two tours, volunteer. He won't talk about what he saw or did there, but my late Mom said he often woke up with night terrors. He wouldn't even speak to her about Vietnam. Your writing gave me a glimpse of what that was (is?) like for him. Thank-you!

New England Multimedia
New England Multimedia

 @TheJackB  @Soulati | B2B Social Media Marketing Curiosity got the best of me and I had to read "Pools of Blood." Great bit of writing there, Jack. (The Jack. The Jack B. Can I call you Jack?) I can read scenes like you've written, but I can't watch them on screen, because it's too real for me. Reading, though, lets me temper my imagination and control what I see. Again, nice writing. I liked it. 

Soulati | Hybrid PR
Soulati | Hybrid PR moderator

 @TheJackB Feisty man. I try to insulate myself from horrific scenes as such you describe as I have an extremely visual brain. I can see someone dear to me in that situation, and I cringe and it depresses and fears me. I read it. I just didn't like it. Nothing against you; it's all on me.

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